Morris Booth Miller and Elizabeth Booth Miller Collection - Chester County History Center

Morris Booth Miller and Elizabeth Booth Miller Collection

Collection Title: Morris Booth Miller and Elizabeth Booth Miller Collection

Collection Number: 193

Dates of Collection: 1806-1966

Box Numbers: 10

RepositoryChester County Historical Society Library

Language: English

Project Archivist: Margaret M. Baillie

Biography:

Morris Booth Miller was born on July 25, 1868 in Chester, Pennsylvania, to Isaac Levis and Clara Booth Miller. He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1899 with the degree of Medical Doctor. Eleanor Elliott was born in 1862 and they married in 1896. One daughter was born to them, Elizabeth Elliot Miller.  She married Scott Grissell Lamb, U.S.N., in June, 1922.  Dr. Miller died on November 4, 1924, of heart failure.  Mrs. Miller died at the age of 95 on October 29, 1956.  Elizabeth died on November 19, 1964 at the age of 66.

Abstract:

The collection spans the years from 1806 -1966 with the bulk of the collection covering 1905-1928.  It consists of personal, medical, and military correspondence, diaries and ephemera.  Dr. Miller served during WWI aboard the USS Harrisburg and the USS Grant as the Surgeon.  In the 1920s, he and Elizabeth took a world cruise which included a stop in China to visit with their daughter Elizabeth and her husband Scott Lamb and newborn granddaughter Elizabeth.  He also made a second stop in Japan to offer his assistance during the 1923 earthquake.  

Information For Researchers:

  • Access:
    Collection is open for research.
  • Publication Rights:
    For permission to reproduce or to publish, please contact the Librarian of CCHS Library.
  • Preffered Citation:
    Morris Booth Miller and Elizabeth Booth Miller Collection Ms. Coll. 193. Chester County Historical Society Library, West Chester, Pennsylvania.
  • Acquisition Information:
    Donated by Elizabeth Elliot Lamb Reyes in 1966. She was the granddaughter of Morris and Elizabeth Miller. Genealogy information for the Booth and Miller families are also in the collection
  • Processing History:
    Final processing and finding aid prepared using DACS by Margaret Miles Baillie, 2018.

Related Material:

See also the Elizabeth E. Lamb Photo Collection, DN22, for additional family photographs. 

Collections Contents:

Series I: Navy Medical Reserves Corp & World War I

– Box 1: 1912-1923
– Folder 1 – Medical Reserve Corps, U.S. Navy. Appointment & Info. 1912-1913.
– Folder 2 – Applications letters for Navy Hospital Unit. May-July 1918
– Folder 3 – Correspondence from doctors to M. B. Miller 1918
– Folder 4 – Job descriptions and responsibilities No. 1-4. Blank answer paper
– Folder 5 – Ships General Orders May 1918, Memorandums September-October 1918. Departing letter December 13, 1918
– Folder 6 – Gas Defense Bulletin 1-3 B.M.S.N.D.
– Folder 7 – Personnel Correspondence, May-June 1918.
– Folder 8 – Personnel Citizenship
– Folder 9 – Personnel Navy Nurse Corps.
– Folder 10 – Morris’ packing list and family pass
– Folder 11 – Maps: London n.d., Paris n.d. circa pre 1919
– Folder 12 – Passes to Paris (2), Receipt for provisions: Raisins from Mme. Crepin
– Folder 13 – Booklets “The Conflict for Human Liberty” by Viscount Grey, Song booklet from John Wanamaker Store, July 1918, Community Singing booklet, others.
– Folder 14 – Ephemera: November 29, 1917, USS President Grant Menu, 1917 Patriotic Songs booklet from The Evening Bulletin (Philadelphia). Piece of English Airplane Linen from Liverpool. Bill of Fare for the General Mess September 17, 1917.
– Folder 15 – Wireless Press, September-October 1918. Sea Life, February 11, 1919
– Folder 16 – News by Radio December 28-31, 1917. Letter from Captain J. P. Morton, January 12, 1918. Photocopy of USS Grant, March 1919.
– Folder 17 – Official Signal Messages re: influenza, October 1918. Thank you note October 29 1918 signed by 5 men.
– Folder 18 – Photo of USS Harrisburg (postcard), patient tag, Roster of Officers, September 1, 1918. Roster of Officers, n.d. USS President Grant.
– Folder 19 – Syllabus for treatment procedures weeks 1 & 2 and Dakin’s Solution.
– Folder 20 – Ephemera: 1918 Christmas Dinner USS Harrisburg Song Sheet, Officers and crew menus. 1918 Dinner for V. Admiral Albert Gleaves, 12/11/1918, with autographs.
– Folder 21 – Press Release August 7, 1919, from Philadelphia paper either the Bulletin or Inquirer.
– Folder 22 – Booklet: “Scraps of Paper”, German Proclamations 37 pages.
– Folder 23 – Discharge Pay and Statement of Account, August 20, 1919.
– Folder 24 – Medical War Manual #4, Military Orthopaedic Surgery 1919. The Record of BETA Chapter in the Great War.
– Folder 25 –U.S.N.R.F. Medical Inspector Certificate July 1919. Military Order of Foreign Wars of the U.S. Certificate January 1921. War Society of the Cruiser and Transport Force.
– Folder 26 – Misc. Medical Correspondence 1919-1921.
– Folder 27 – U.S. Naval Reserve papers 1921-1923.

– Box 2: Typed transcript of time on board ships and carbon copies of military/government papers.

– Book one: World War I Diary of Morris Booth Miller September 1, 1917 – May 2, 1919.
– Book two: carbon copies of military/government papers February 7, 1917 – March 3, 1923.

Series II: Correspondence

Medical and WWI Related

– Box 1: 1905, 1914-1917

Folder 1 – Letter to Elizabeth E. Miller from father January 16, 1905
Folder 2 – Morris to Eleanor, 1914 (with obits for Mary Irwin Agnew), Morris to Eleanor July 6, 1914.
Folder 3 – Envelope to Morris B. Miller from R. W. McCredy, June 7, 1918. Contains paper prints of Kaiser Wilhelm.
Folder 4 – Morris to Elizabeth, 6 letters. July 1917.
Folder 5 – Correspondence to M Morris B. Miller, 2 letters. July-August, 1917
Folder 6 – Morris to Eleanor and Elliot, 8 letters. August 5-14, 1917
Folder 7 – Morris to Eleanor, 7 letters. August 15-21, 1917
Folder 8 – Morris to Family, 5 letters. August 23-28, 1917
Folder 9 – Morris to Family, 3 letters. August 29-31, 1917
Folder 10 – Aunt Sara E Booth to Eleanor, 1 letter. September 3, 1917
Folder 11 – Morris/Eleanor/Others, 12 letters. September 1917
Folder 12 – Morris to Eleanor, 11 letters. October 1917
Folder 13 – Others to Eleanor, 3 items. October 1917
Folder 14 – Morris to Eleanor, 8 items. November 6-13, 1917
Folder 15 – Morris to Eleanor, 12 items. November 14-30, 1917
Folder 16 – Morris to Eleanor, 17 items. December 1917

– Box 2: 1918-1919

Folder 1 – Morris to Eleanor, 9 items. January-February, 1918
Folder 2 – Morris to Eleanor, 8 items. March-April, 1918
Folder 3 – Morris to Family, 11 items. August 1918
Folder 4 – Morris to Family, 2 items. October-December, 1918
Folder 5 – Note on Envelope w leaves. Envelope address le Secours Duryea, n.d.
Folder 6 – Newspaper Clippings, December 1918
Folder 7 – Morris to Eleanor, 6 items. January 1919
Folder 8 – Morris to Eleanor, 2 items. September 1919

Miscellaneous Correspondence, Genealogy Items and Ephemera

– Box 3:

Folder 1 – Correspondence Morris to Mother 1887, 1889
Folder 2 – Correspondence Morris to Eleanor July 4, 1894, 1907, and wedding related, map of Brussels, info on first house.
Folder 3 – Correspondence Elizabeth to father M.B. Miller
Folder 4 – Correspondence from “Babs” 1914
Folder 5 – Correspondence – Sarah B. Flitcraft (Mrs. Allan) and obituary
Folder 6 – Correspondence – John B. Miller
Folder 7 – Correspondence – Bessie
Folder 8 – Correspondence – M.B. Miller’s Parents
Folder 9 – Correspondence, Misc. 1900-1873, 1892, 1900-1913
Folder 10 – Correspondence, Misc. 1914-1916
Folder 11 – Correspondence, Misc. 1917-1921
Folder 12 – Correspondence, Misc. 1923-1924
Folder 13 – Correspondence, Misc. n.d.
Folder 14 – 1908 Cruise/Trip to Europe Receipts
Folder 15 – 1908 Family Cruise/Trip to Europe, and 1911
Folder 16 – 1911 Morris B. Miller Fishing Trip to Nova Scotia. Includes published article in September 2, 1911, copy of Forest and Stream.
Folder 17 – 1911 trip photos, map and reprint of article
Folder 18 – 1930 Eleanor E. Miller Trip to Europe, Passport
Folder 19 – Ephemera, Doctor related, calling card, etc.
Folder 20 – Ephemera: 13 calling cards, 1 “wallet” photo of Elizabeth. E. Miller Lambert, 1 poem
Folder 21 – Ephemera related to daughter E.E. Miller-Lamb
Folder 22 – Ephemera related to M.B. Miller posthumous, sympathy cards, etc.
Folder 23 – Ephemera Cards, Christmas, Easter, etc.
Folder 24 – Ephemera, Currency Promissory notes from Philadelphia, Wilmington, New Hampshire, Rhode Island 1806-1815. 5 items
Folder 25 – Ephemera June 1849, N. Carolina, “Dr. Wm. B. Harrell”
Folder 26 – Ephemera 1890-1900
Folder 27 – Newspaper Clippings, 1904 on Baltimore War of 1812, 1905 Russo-Japanese War.

– Box 4: Family Genealogy

Folder 1 – Miller Correspondence 1848, John Booth
Folder 2 – Miller Family Bible Records
Folder 3 – Miller-Gallaway-Fulton
Folder 4 – Miller and Booth family background from sources compiled by Clara Booth Miller, CCHS donor records, newspaper files
Folder 5 – Newspaper clippings family members
Folder 6 – Miller family history and correspondence re: descendants of Henry Miller
Folder 7 – Dr. M.B. Miller professional articles
Folder 8 – Mrs. Morris Booth Miller honorary organizations and memorials, including list of Honor Roll for the World War Memorial Grove, West Fairmount Park, Philadelphia.
Folder 9 – Miller connection to Pennock descendants of Pusey Pennock
Folder 10 – Miller family, Notes, typed, written manuscripts, correspondence concerning the history of the Miller family.
Folder 11 – Miller family charts
Folder 12 – Miller family notebook, and copy of History of Delaware County for the Past Century by Hon. John M. Broomall, Media, PA, 1876.
Folder 13 – Miller family notes, typed manuscripts on the history of the Miller family, correspondence.
Folder 14 – Copy of Legislative Record, Harrisburg, Saturday April 14, 1855, belonging to John Miller. And The Miller Family of Maple Grove.
Folder 15 – Manuscripts for Two Westerns by Dr. M.B. Miller
Folder 16 – Correspondence to & from Dr. M.B. Miller, Mrs. M.B. Miller, etc. circa late 1880s to 1940s.
Folder 17 – Correspondence to & from Dr. M.B. Miller and Mrs. M.B. Miller. Circa early 1900sDischarge papers for Isaac Miller, Marriage Certificate circa 1731.
Folder 18 – Civil War Discharge papers for Isaac Miller, Marriage Certificate circa 1731.

Series III: World Cruise 1923-1924

– Box 1: Trip around the world, paperwork and ephemera

Folder 1 – Trip itinerary, miles travelled, trip paperwork
Folder 2 – Bills/Receipts
Folder 3 – American Red Cross Shanghai Unit Cloth armbands and “Surgeon Miller” name tag
Folder 4 – Kobe Earthquake Newspaper Articles (see also digital scans station)
Folder 5 – Kobe Earthquake Postcards (caution: graphic)
Folder 6 – Typed transcript of Morris’ letters July 12, 1923 to June 1924, Trip around the world.
Folder 7 – Kobe Earthquake Relief #1 – Official Report by Capt. S. Robinson, Photo of medical personnel under Dr. Miller’s direction in the Japanese relief, list of persons, and other correspondence.
Folder 8 – Kobe Earthquake Relief #2– addition personnel list, autographs, article, letters from Tommy Tompkins to Maj. A. Bassett, reports on wounded, etc.
Folder 9 – Letter 11/5/1923 from NY Times employee to Morris w a postcard which shows a house. 2 Copies of newspaper articles (same as found in folder 4). Letter from American Consular Service to Morris, Letter from J. W. Colbert, M.D. to Morris Oct., 1923. Naval Dispatch to Morris. Letter from A. Bassett to Morris., Telegram to Morris from General McCoy.

– Box 2: Morris B. Miller’s Letters

Folder 1 – July 27 – August 6, 1923
Folder 2 – August 12 – 21, 1923
Folder 3 – August 25 – September 4, 1923
Folder 4 – September 8 – October 2, 1923 (Kobe Earthquake)
Folder 5 – October 4 – 26, 1923
Folder 6 – November 2 – 26, 1923; Admiral Oriental Line Souvenir Passenger List.
Folder 7 – December 1 – 23, 1923
Folder 8 – December 24, 1923 – January 2, 1924
Folder 9 – January 4 – 29, 1924
Folder 10 – January 29 – February 28, 1924
Folder 11 – March 1 – 31, 1924
Folder 12 – April 1 – May 2, 1924
Folder 13 – May 3 – 22, 1924
Folder 14 – 13 Hand-colored photos. Assumed from China. 2 may be from the Philippines.

– Box 3: Eleanor Miller’s Letters

Folder 1 – July 1923
Folder 2 – August –September 1923
Folder 3 – October 1923
Folder 4 – November 1923
Folder 5 – December 1923
Folder 6 – January 1924
Folder 7 – February 1924
Folder 8 – March – April 1924

Series IV: Diaries and other books

1. Morris B. Miller – seven items spanning 1917-1923

Diary 1: Sept. 1, 1917 – Jan. 9, 1918
Geographic locations: New York, at sea on the USS Grant, France

Format: Tiny (~2×3 inches), black leather diary, “John B. Miller, 1752” and an image of four entwined hands printed on the cover, first page reads “The Philadelphia Contributionship” with information about the company and various “useful information”

Condition: Good

Topics: Health/medicine, Military

Overview: Morris B. Miller’s account of his entry into WWI as a surgeon in the Medical Reserve Corps of the Navy. He works on a transport ship, the USS Grant, moving soldiers from NY to France.

Notes on content:
– First entry: “Now it has come about that today we are at grips in a war that makes the Civil War look like a small matter. Therefore it happens that I consider myself highly privileged to take a part, even though a small one, in a conflict the results of which are now unknown but the effects of which are bound to modify to a tremendous extent the lives of millions yet unborn.”
– Includes a newspaper clipping to go along with account of teaching new Navy medical recruits, “$30 a cadaver.”
– Talks about getting the ship, officers, and other men ready to set off, various safety drills are practiced almost daily
– Measles “epidemic” on board followed by pneumonia
– Have to return to NY for repairs shortly after departure
– Jan. 5, 1918 – exciting “submarine” encounter, turns out to be fish
– Meet with naval escort near isotherm of Savannah, Georgia
– Jan. 9, 1918 – “The total Army cases admitted to the sick bay from Dec. 26th to Jan 9th inclusive, a period off exactly two weeks, is 110, of which 38 were pneumonia. As the total Army passengers are 4894 this is not a bad record. Have had 4 deaths […] the last item must be modified as last night brought us another death, a total of 5.”
– Jan. 10, 1918 – reach destination – Brest, France

Diary 2: Jan. 11, 1918 – Aug. 29, 1918
Geographic locations: at sea on the USS Grant; Brest, France; NY; back to Brest; Newport

Format: small, green leather diary (~2×3 inches), “compliments of Logan Trust Company of Philadelphia, 1431 Chestnut Street,” gold logo on cover, cover page signed “Morris B. Miller, Surgeon, U.S.N.R.F. 2nd Val (?)”

Condition: Good

Topics: Health/medicine, Military

Overview: As a surgeon in the Medical Reserve Corps of the Navy in WWI, discusses transporting soldiers to and from France, spends time in Paris, and is promoted to Senior Medical Officer.

Notes on content:
– Begins with their arrival in France, moving the sick and exploring Paris, description of the French hospitals
– Jan. 22, 1918 – back at sea, heading to US
– Jan. 27, 1918 – entry lists numbers of illnesses
– Jan. 28, 1918 – big storm occurs, broken glass everywhere
– Feb. 4, 1918 – entry contains table with “Distances Travelled in Grant”
– Feb. 6, 1918 – reach US soil at Hoboken
– Feb. 17, 1918 – waiting to head out again, discusses new “moving picture outfit” and Victrola. “New York, in a panoramic sense, has claimed me deep admiration.”
– Feb. 18, 1918 – crewman killed in coal spill on ship
– Feb. 19, 1918 – “The present convoy is a large one and there must be about 20,000 troops afloat in the various ships of this unit.”
– March 10, 1918 – discusses time spent in France, covers about a week, most of the landmarks in Paris were covered to protect from airstrikes
– March 12, 1918 – grisly accident in the inner harbor
– March 13, 1918 – “Have been made a censor.”
– May 10, 1918 – he is asked to help set up a Naval Station Hospital in Philadelphia, Unit 16
– June 19, 1918 – promoted to Senior Medical Officer
– July 25, 1918 – “Fifty years old today.”
– Aug. 20, 1918 – back in NY to serve on the Harrisburg, a naval transport vessel
– Writes about getting the sick bay on the Harrisburg in order

Diary 3: Aug. 30, 1918 – Oct. 11, 1918
Geographic locations: NY; at sea on the USS Harrisburg; Brest, France; NY; back at sea

Format: small, black leather diary

Condition: Good

Topics: Health/medicine, Military, Weather

Overview: As a surgeon in the Medical Reserve Corps of the Navy in WWI, discusses transporting soldiers to and from France.

Notes on content:
– Aug. 30, 1918 – “The totals are officers 67, UCO 539, enlisted men 1765, making a total of 2371. To these must be added 244 overseas draft sailors, and we have 2615. The sailors are sleeping in hammock all over the decks.”
– Sept. 3, 1918 – “This has been a hard day for everybody. Troops were kept below until this afternoon when they were let up to get their one meal while their compartments were policed. The poor Negros had a particularly bad time as they are closely packed and none too clean. One darky was heard to say that if he ever got to France he was ‘going to cable his old woman that she was a free woman, he certainly was never coming back.’”
– Sept. 12, 1918 – reach Brest, France
– Sept. 14, 1918 – nice discussion of the bravery of the wounded
– Sept. 23, 1918 – leaving for NYC
– Oct. 2, 1918 – return to NYC, “At 2:40 am I was called by the night nurse with the statement that Lt. Lippett had died. I went down and found he was merely sound asleep.”
– Oct. 11, 1918 – “Off again!” Lists number of men on board. “There are three of us in column formation, Plattsburgh, Harrisburg, and Maui, with a new destroyer for escort. Three dirigibles, one a beauty, and two hydroplanes have watched us out, very picturesque!”

Diary 4: Oct. 12, 1918 – May 2, 1919
Geographic locations: at sea; Brest, France; NY; Liverpool

Format: small, black leather diary, “Wannamaker’s Date Book 1918” on cover

Condition: Paper is fine but cover is crumbling and smears black

Topics: Health/medicine, Military, Travel

Overview: Surgeon on a naval transport in WWI, discusses pneumonia and influenza epidemic on board, armistice is signed while they are at sea, trip to Liverpool to bring soldiers home.

Notes on content:
– Oct. 12, 1918 – influenza spreading among crew and troops
– Oct. 15, 1918 – soldier dies of pneumonia, sick bays are full
– Oct. 17, 1918 – another man dies, peak of epidemic seems to have passed
– Oct. 21, 1918 – reach Brest, France
– Oct. 22, 1918 – “Apparently the influenza situation is very bad over here. Each ship coming in is in trouble and we got out easily compared to the average. The Grant, I heard, has had over 100 deaths on her last trip.”
– Oct. 23, 1918 – “I think I can safely say we are out of our troubles for the present. We have had 9 deaths on board, 7 Army and 2 Navy. Haven’t had a chance to total up the numbers of cases but it is in the neighborhood of 250.”
– Oct. 28, 1918 – “At chow tonight word was flashed over to us that Austria had collapsed!”
– Oct. 31, 1918 – received word that Turkey surrendered
– Nov. 6, 1918 – back at sea, headed to NY
– Nov. 7, 1918 – list of distances he had traveled at sea “30,200”
– Nov. 9, 1918 – “I recall that most of these songs that are sung about the joys of a sailor’s life are all sung well inland.”
– Nov. 11, 1918 – contains a printed message from the US Naval Radio Service – ‘Armistice signed at five AM November eleventh hostilities ceased at eleven AM twenty 13011’ “3:45 PM Peace!!!” there is a little party on board the ship
– Nov. 12, 1918 – “I am filled with thankfulness for the result, saddened by the thought of the cost in life and suffering, and proud of my people and nation, who were permitted late in the day to make sure and decisive victory.”
– Nov. 14, 1918 – back to NY, contains newspaper clipping with two blurbs – one about his ship leaving Brest for NY and another about the poor treatment wounded soldiers received from Germans
– Nov. 17, 1918 – “On the 15th I got all my work completed by 3 o’clock and turned affairs over to Dr. Sibila. The 4 o’clock train got me home in time for dinner, and such a dinner it was! Then came a family reunion and still later I got a shock which was worse than being torpedoed when I learned that a certain young soldier had captured my Sallie’s heart. But as this is a war diary I need not enter my comments on that subject here.”
– Dec. 2, 1918 – contains a newspaper clipping “America ships took 46 1/4 %” about US transports
– Dec. 17, 1918 – newspaper clipping “The Gob” about the perilous life of a sailor
– Jan. 18, 1919 – back at sea, heading to drop off mail and Red Cross supplies and bring troops back
– Jan. 27, 1919 – arrive at Canada Dock, Liverpool
– Jan. 31, 1919 – leave Liverpool for Brest
– Feb. 1, 1919 – contains newspaper clipping “Transport brings 400 home”
– Feb. 2, 1919 – arrive in Brest, unloading ships, loading on wounded
– Feb. 5, 1919 – back at sea heading to US
– Feb. 6, 1919 – discussion of the “mistake to make any colored officers”
– Fed. 11, 1919 – big storm, “My muscles are sore from hanging on.”
– Feb. 15, 1919 – back in NYC
– For about a month, he is in the Naval Hospital with some illness, earaches lead to temporary deafness in both ears
– May 2, 1919 – “Detached today from active duty after twenty three months of service. I resume my status on the reserves list.”

Diary 5: June 22, 1921 – July 21, 1921
Geographic locations: Newburgh, NY; Greenfield, MA; Port aux Basque; Newfoundland; Cape Breton; New Glasgow; Halifax

Format: thin, black leather diary with sticker inside reading “W.H. Hoskins Stationer 815 Chestnut St. Phila”

Condition: Good, along the tops of the pages is a sort of makeshift address book

Topics: Social life/Activities, Travel

Overview: Documents a trip to Canada for salmon fishing.

Notes on content:
– June 22, 1921 – “Our long planned salmon trip to Newfoundland is at last underway. This morning at 8:45 am Sam Kneass, Elizabeth [his daughter] and I started from 404 S. 21st St. in his handsome new Stutz car.”
– Describes drive through New England, mentions small towns and landmarks they saw, describes landscape etc.
– June 27, 1921 – cross into New Brunswick “[…] after we passed the 3 mile limit it was legal and proper to get a drink served by a real steward.”
– June 30, 1921 – leave car and get on a boat to Newfoundland, description of small Canadian villages, fishing
– July 6, 1921 – “Eureka! Sapristi! And then some! Success has at last come to us and now we know the thrills and keen excitement of landing salmon.”
– July 21, 1921 – journal ends upon arrival in Milford “[…] the total distance of the trip from Philadelphia was 2015 miles.”

Diary 6: June 14, 1922 – July 17, 1922
Geographic locations: Driving to Newfoundland; Newburgh, NY; Greenfield, MA; Bethel, ME; Bangor, ME; Nova Scotia; Newfoundland

Format: narrow, red notebook with stamp inside reading “A. Pomerantz & Co. In the heart of Phila”

Condition: good

Topics: Social life/Activities, Travel

Overview: Documents another trip to Canada for salmon fishing.

Notes on content:
– June 14, 1922 – “Again we are on our way by auto to Newfoundland for salmon fishing.”
– June 23, 1922 – arrive at their first fishing stop
– July 14, 1922 – they have caught 160 pounds of fish on the trip


Diary 7: July 17, 1923 – July 23, 1923
Geographic locations: Train trip across the US; Pittsburgh; Chicago; N. Dakota; Montana; Yellowstone

Format: small, dark brown leather diary

Condition: good, “The Excelsior Diary 1922,” first pages are calendars and useful info such as “combinations of colors,” “to tell time of tides,” and “poisons and antidotes”

Topics: Social life/Activities, Travel, Weather

Overview: Brief account of a trip to the West by train.

Notes on content:
– July 17, 1923 – “We are well started on our way on the Great Adventure.” They left Philadelphia by train on the 12th and stopped in Pittsburgh to see family for a few days. Stopped briefly in Chicago then off to Montana by train as well. “For ten or fifteen minutes we were subject to a fine hail which made one think of machine gun fire. The stones were perfectly huge, many as large as hens’ eggs. In a few minutes practically all of the windows on the north side of the train were smashed.”
– July 23, 1923 – see the Yellowstone River and the badlands
– Towards the back there is a list of expenses (train tickets, etc.)

2. Eleanor Miller – five items spanning 1908 – 1928

Diary 1: Jun 13, 1908 – Sept. 12, 1908
Geographic locations: Left from Philadelphia by boat and travelled through Europe

Format: red leather diary, contains various ephemera from the trip – newspaper clippings, pressed plants, hotel bills, etc.

Condition: good, some tears on front cover and spine

Topics: Social life/Activities, Travel

Overview: Documents a trip to Europe with her family.

Notes on content:
– Inside cover lists Philadelphia address (2117 Pine Street Phila.) and dates the diary June 4, 1908
– First entry is on June 13, 1908
– Sailed on the SS Menominee with husband, Morris, and daughter, Elizabeth, leaving from Washington Ave, Philadelphia.
– Visited museums, sites and landmarks in Europe
– Attended an orchestra in Heidelberg, Germany
– Visited Versailles

Diary 2: June 24, 1911 – Sept. 7, 1911

Geographic locations: At sea, France, Italy, Germany

Format: red leather notebook, inside cover reads “Eleanor E Miller 2117 Pine St. Phila. June 21st 1911,” contains many bits of ephemera placed between pages – tickets etc.

Condition: fair, binding in falling apart and front cover is separated

Topics: Social life/Activities, Travel

Overview: Expansive tour of Europe, plenty of sightseeing and socializing.

Notes on content:
– June 24, 1911 – They left Philadelphia on the 22nd on the ship The Prinz Adalbert, the Hamburg-American line
– July 1, 1911 – “One excitement – a homeward bound battleship from the coronation.”
– July 4, 1911 – Arrive in France, description of the town
– July 5, 1911 – Day trip to Amiens with small print of Amiens Cathedral. Took a train to Paris.
– July 6 – 10, 1911 – Shopping, socializing, sightseeing in Paris
– Orleans, Chambord, Tours, Bordeaux, Toulouse, Luxembourg
– July 19, 1911 – Nimes, includes a photo labeled ‘Nimes Wed. July 19, 1911’ and a flower pinned to the page
– Avignon, Arles, Marseilles, Nice
– July 23, 1911 – “Find Nice much changed, station entirely new with tunneled walks etc – but a place must grow in 19 years, and it was then the 21st of last March that we were given such a send off.”
– July 24, 1911 – Left for Monte Carlo then Genoa
– Pisa, Florence, Venice, Toblach, Cortina, Munich, Ratisbon, Nuremburg, Berlin
– Aug. 20, 1911 – “Berlin is a large, well laid out city – but does not impress us with its cleanliness as did Munich or wherever else women clean the streets.”
– Aug. 26, 1911 – See a parade in Hamburg, “Emperor, Empress, Crown Prince and Princess, and Princess Victoria __ (?) and their escorts. All round that great field they passed their soldiers and then took up their positions. The Kaiser standing out alone…”
– Aug. 27, 1911 – Leave Germany by ship
– Sept. 7, 1911 – still at sea
– Contains an itinerary at the back

Diary 3: July 7, 1923 – Oct. 21, 1923
Geographic locations: Cross county in US, Western Canada, Japan, China

Format: black leather diary, contains ephemera from trip including newspaper articles about their trip, telegraphs, business cards, tickets, pressed leaves, etc.

Condition: good, front cover reads ‘Record,’ insider cover lists “Eleanor E Miller 2310 Pine Street Philadelphia 1923”

Topics: Social life/Activities, Travel

Overview: Documents trip across the US and then to Asia by boat. (Beginning corresponds to Morris B. Miller’s Diary 7 – July 1923.)

Notes on content:
– Left Philadelphia in July 1923
– Travelled through the West, stopping in Chicago, Yellowstone National Park, Seattle
– Left from Canada by boat and arrived in Japan Aug. 8, 1923
– Travelled by car and train though Japan
– China
– There are numerous newspaper articles inserted towards the end from 1937 concerning was with China and Japan


Diary 4: Oct. 27, 1923 – Nov. 5, 1924
Geographic locations: Travelled to Asia, then Middle East, Mediterranean, Europe

Format: black leather diary, front reads “Record,” contains ephemera such as postcards, business cards, newspaper clippings, dinner invitations, hotel ads, tickets, and many pressed flowers and leaves

Condition: fair

Topics: Social life/Activities, Travel

Overview: Continues the trip begun in Diary 3, traveling around the world with her husband, Morris B. Miller. Final entry notes his death soon after they return from their 15 month adventure.

Notes on content:
– Inserted page in front lists ‘Where we stopped on our trip around the world 1923”
– First page lists ‘Ships we sailed on 1923 – 1924”
– Travelled through Asia then the Middle East, Northern Africa, Mediterranean and Europe with her husband.
– Return home Sept. 18, 1924
– “One more entry – My previous companion and love of 30 years left me Wednesday November 5th 1924 at 9:35 am. His death was as beautiful as his life.”

Diary 5: May 29, 1928 – Sept. 28, 1928
Geographic locations: At sea, extensive trip through Europe, UK, France, Spain, Switzerland, etc.

Format: black leather diary

Condition: good, contains ephemera including tickets, postcards, a photograph of an older woman, note confirming vaccinations, newspaper clippings

Topics: Social life/Activities, Travel

Overview: Four month trip through Europe with friends, Helen, Miss Hutchinson, and Anne, including much sightseeing, shopping, and socializing.

Notes on content:
– Left USA Sunday May 27th, arrive at Cadiz, Spain on June 10th
– June 11, 1928 – arrive in Seville, after dinner “Miss H in one of her tantrums, left us.”
– June 14, 1928 – arrive in Cordoba
– June 15, 1928 – description of Cordoba’s Mosque Cathedral
– June 17 – 30, 1928 – Granada, Madrid, Segovia, Burgos, San Sebastian, Biarritz
– July 3, 1928 – Cauterets “and then began our up climb over the Col d’Aubesque and such a terrifying ride I never hope to take again.”
– July 7 – 11, 1928 – Carcassonne, Avignon, Switzerland
– No entries between July 21 and Aug. 17. Still sightseeing, socializing, and shopping
– Aug. 22, 1928 – back to Paris. “I slept much en route, and even Helen napped a bit. Was much depressed and wished we were going anywhere but to Paris.”
– Aug. 23, 1928 – “At 11, Helen and I went out, took a taxi to Madame Michaud and spent money like drunken sailors.”
– Sept. 5, 1928 – arrive in London
– Sept. 19, 1928 – Dinas Powis, Wales
– Sept. 22, 1928 – at sea heading back to US from Liverpool. “Paid my bill and was off to the W-star docks at 1:20 and soon aboard.”
– Sept. 28, 1928 – final entry, still at sea.

Wedding service and registry November 18, 1896

– Morris Booth Miller and Eleanor Elliot certificate and license.
– Witnesses (assumed Morris and Eleanor’s wedding)
– Then witnesses signed for November 18, 1921.

Registry of Attendance at the Bi-centennial of the Emigration of Henry Miller, June 1914
– Names and addresses of descendants of Henry and other family members.